Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Turbo Lag

Don't look now, but there's another animated feature steaming down the pike.

... Early buzz — which includes social media chatter — suggests [DreamWorks Animation's Turbo] is tracking below the norm for past DWA films, with a five-day bow projected in the mid-$30 millions. However, the film has been making inroads lately and should continue to gain traction over the next eight days. ...

The report estimates “Turbo” will earn roughly $150 million at the domestic box office, which translates to around four-and-a-half times its opening. Fox’s first DWA release, “The Croods,” saw a similar Stateside multiple ...

I've wondered about having a snail as a leading man, but the designs are winsome, the car sequences well-staged, and artists on the picture tell me the cartoon works.

It all comes down to the viewing public. I wish there were fewer high-profile animated releases elbowing each other at the same time, but summer windows are what they are, and there is a lot of product crowding the marketplace right now. DisneyToon Studio's Planes (son of Cars) hits in mere weeks. Then there are the little blue people otherwise knowsn as Smurfs, soon to appear at a theater near you.

1 comments:

Roberto Severino said...

Someone on Twitter made a bunch of good points about how the animation industry needs someone to give it a nice good kick in its butt and how bad things are when a film like Despicable Me 2 is trending on Twitter and #1 at the box office.

It's a sign of complacency and I think that needs to change. Get the hacks and soulless corporate influence out of the business and let cartoonists with great ideas do their jobs. Period.

I was kind of disappointed with one of Amid Amidi's posts a while back, but I kind of realize that he's also at least trying to get people to stop being so complacent and satisfied with being so safe and accepting lack of drawing skills and aesthetics in animation. Those are my thoughts by the way. I hope I'm not being too much of a downer.

I also believe that animators need to not only look up to the standards of the past (Golden Age) for drawing and storytelling but they should be able to create ways of maintaining those standards and going in completely new, exciting directions if that makes sense.

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