Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Missed Air Date

Some cartoons just don't get done in time.

For the first time in South Park‘s 17-season, 240-ish-episode history, its creators blew deadline. Tonight’s episode did not get finished, Comedy Central said this afternoon. “On Tuesday night, South Park Studios lost power,” the network said. “From animation to rendering to editing and sound, all of their computers were down for hours, and they were unable to finish episode 1704 Goth Kids 3: Dawn of the Posers in time for air tonight.” Said co-creator Trey Parker in a statement, “It sucks to miss an airdate, but after all these years of tempting fate by delivering the show last minute, I guess it was bound to happen.” ...

Maybe they could have redubbed/relooped an old show. That would have kept the record intact. Just say it was planned, air it, and move on. Who's going to complain?

6 comments:

Matthew said...

Yeah Steve, because instead of working hard and getting something done as soon or as best you can, you should actually just re-dub/re-use & shovel crap out to maintain the illustrious glow of your "Reputation"... Watching the South Park Documentary: 6 Days to Air one could even argue that they're already shoveling crap.

Steve Hulett said...

Hey, if David Letterman can redub one of HIS shows ...

Matthew said...

Well David Letterman & those with his creative ethos have my deepest sympathies...

Tell me something Steve, is releasing content continuously, no matter what that content is about, or what it says, or what the quality is like, really the overall name of the game that media companies & producers are into?

Because most artists I speak to aren't enamored by that prospect, because despite the joy of 'Having The Work', isn't it really "all for not" if you can't be proud of the content?

But lets be cynical for just a moment here... even if your work has some for of substance to it, is there really much purpose to what we do beyond simply generating consumable silver disks, downloads or cinema ticket Sales for corporations?

Everyone wants to create & be a part of something GOOD or MEANINGFUL, hopefully BOTH. But beyond that, it's to share life, food & good moments with our loved ones. And I guess maintain that existence until we shuffle off into eternity as dust or whatever. I wonder how many people regret not becoming Doctors in order to earn a living...

Christopher Sobieniak said...

I'm only impressed the show managed to make it this far at all. They should just keep cranking out a new episode every week if they think they can make it happen (didn't stop the Japanese from doing the same stint on a single cartoon show for the past 44 years and counting).

Steve Hulett said...

Matthew, you're on a slippery track when trying to sort out Good from Indifferent from Bad.

I think producers, even conglomerates, want to create "good" content, want do have a level of quality, if possible. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't. I think Pixar, in its heart of hearts, wants to create topnotch work everytime at bat. Ditto DreamWorks. Also Blue Sky Studios.
And Disney TVA.

When I worked at Filmation, I knew we were not creating the best content, but when I was doing the work, I was always striving to do the highest-quality job I could muster. I took pride and enjoyment in that. (But yeah, I always knew I was working at Filmation.)

I don't think it's always possible to know if you're doing good and meaningful work. I don't think that the creators of, for instance, "Casablanca" knew they were doing a "classic." They were trying to get a feature out on budget, one that they were writing as they shot. That was pretty much it.

Most people in our business strive to do good work, and hope the projects on which they labor turn out okay. That's about all most folks can hope for while in mid-flight.

Matthew said...

Steve,

Just wanted to say thanks for taking the time to write up your last reply. Coz I agree with everything you've said regarding always striving to do the highest-quality work one can muster while on the job & neck-deep in production. Initially when talking about re-dubbing, frankienstiening & flushing out junk for the sake of an insane TV deadline, I felt compelled to voice the opinion that most folk would rather fall on their own sword than willingly be a part of another needlessly terrible addition to the channels on the idiot-box. I'm glad to see that I'm talking to a fellow artist who also holds those ideals for himself as much as he does for others. And you're right, all we can really do is hope for an overall good outcome & quality project no matter how much the ground is shaking around us while we're trying to do the damn thing.

Cheers.

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