Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Tuesday's General Membership Meeting

Left: Apple consultant and lecturer Ian Mackie. At rear, behind his laptop, is TAG President Kevin Koch.

The main points of TAG's General Membership meeting on Tuesday night:

The Business Representative (yours truly) gave a lengthy report on the first day of The Animation Guild's negotiations with the AMPTP. The producers have (tentatively) accepted the Pension and Health Coverage benefits negotiated last year by the IA, but have not accepted the wage package proposed by the Guild. The producers also have their proposals on the table, through which the parties are slowly chewing through in side bar.

We haven't reached agreement. The next negotiation session is Monday, July 13th ...

Executive board member Stephan Zupkas gave an update on the new TAG building. He explained that most of the work is completed, and we have reached the "touch up" and "final coat of paint" phase. Phones need to be activated, the heating and a/c systems fired up, and the gallery floor cured before final varnishing. After all that, staff will move in to the facility ... hopefully in the next several weeks.

When the meeting adjourned, Apple consultant Ian Mackie devoted an hour and twenty minutes to touting some of the wonders of Apple lap and desktops, among them:

Spotlight: A handy computer search engine that can pull up any file, e-mail or word document. Click on the magnifying glass on the top right of the desktop (command: space bar, then the dialogue box appears. type in the word or phrase spotlight should search for.)

Gmail: the best e-mail service out there, with the best span filters. Free, and Google isn't going aywhere.

Tab-browsing: When searching topics in Google or some other search engine, hold down command key and click on items of interest. Creates tabs on tool bar without leaving the search screen.

Free Apple Training:

Because the Apples have a newer (2001) operating system, at present there are no viruses for Apple computers.

(There was lots more covered, but these are some of the major points. See what you missed by not showing up last night?)

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cool stuff. I appreciate Ian being there.

Anonymous said...

Because the Apples have a newer (2001) operating system, at present there are no viruses for Apple computers.That makes no sense.

Anonymous said...

Makes as much sense as the Apple "I'm a PC/I'm a Mac" commercials claiming that Macs never crash. NEVER CRASH!!!...ROFLMAO!!!!

Anonymous said...

Apple has become what Microsoft used to be, even worse since they charge way too much for their product. Keeping up with their constant OS and software upgrades costs thousands per year. What used to be personal computing for the everyday user has become a consumer product for unchecked upwardly mobile professional consumers. Open source and Palm need to give them a few black eyes. They deserve it.

Anonymous said...

I think Apple currently has the strongest OS and hardware lineup they've ever had. Ive been switching between both Apple and Windows machines for over 20 years, and there's no computer I'd rather have right now than a Mac.

Steve Hulett said...

Because the Apples have a newer (2001) operating system, at present there are no viruses for Apple computers.That makes no sense. ...

I think Ian's point is that the newer operating system (with its built-in protections) has fewer virus threats.

His quote: "There are no viruses ... RIGHT now ... for the operating system."

He also said that could change at any time.

I don't know if he's 100% correct. I'm not an Apple expert.

My 2 Cents said...

I was there. Ian did say there were no viruses for a Mac, (with the exception of one cracked application that had a "Trojan horse" embedded in it), but he never actually explained why that was.

I do, however, agree with the comments above; Macs are way too expensive and previous models and operating systems, (even X systems), become obsolete way too quickly. If you don't keep up with the costly changes, pretty soon you can't download anything, watch anything or use newer versions of software. Bummer.

My 2 Cents (cont.) said...

...and they do crash often.

Anonymous said...

I lovelly the exlanation of Mr. Ian Mackie, Apple consultant and lecturer. Very good , Mr. Ian

Nicole said...

I believe that Ian said that the reason the Trojan got through the Mac's defenses is because the user clicked "install" and gave his/her password. Whereas PCs will launch installer scripts without asking permission, YOU get to choose whether to do that on a Mac. This cracked free software was available for download and unwitting users installed it themselves, inviting the Trojan in.

I've never had a Mac crash, but I've had apps on my Mac crash.

Anonymous said...

I use 3 machines regularly. My Linux machine at work, my Macbook Pro, and my HP desktop home computer

Guess which one crashes ALL THE TIME?

Anonymous said...

Because the Apples have a newer (2001) operating system, at present there are no viruses for Apple computers.That makes no senseApple was willing to build a completely new OS from the ground up while Windows (by necessity, he pointed out!) does not have the luxury to release a version that has no compatibility with previously released programs.

Yes, no viruses (whistling past the graveyard) right now. The trojan mentioned was attached to pirated copies of iWork on the internet. You had to go find, download, and install the darn thing after typing in your password. And I recall one other trojan the year before attached to fake screenshots of Leopard that people wanted to get a sneak peek at. Why some people didn't notice that the "photos" were requesting their installation password is beyond me.

That said, there certainly could be some nasty self-propagating virus at some point. But it's been eight years of OS X. Nothing so far. (crossing fingers)

Keeping up with their constant OS and software upgrades costs thousands per year.Apple updates their OS every couple of years. It costs around $120. A quick search of the internet shows that Windows Vista Home Premium costs $269 retail (I just picked that from Amazon. Lots of flavors of Windows to choose from.) So I would venture to say it is in fact much cheaper. The interesting part is that we discovered that many of the Mac users at the discussion haven't felt the need to upgrade. Several Panther 10.3 users were in attendance.

What was great was that the discussion didn't focus exclusively on the Mac. He talked about web-based vs. client based e-mail (and used Microsoft Outlook as an frequent example for the benefits of using client-based e-mail most of the time), the wonders of Google's free services, and non-platform specific features like tabbed browsing. So hopefully everyone, Mac and PC users (and Linux!?!) got something out of it.

Anonymous said...

It was indeed a very nice discussion that was not all Mac centric. Thanks for hosting it.

And having owned half a dozen non-Mac computers and 3 Macs, the idea that Mac's go out of date sooner or are much more expensive in the long run hasn't been my experience at all. Of course, I count in my lost earnings from the time I've spent reinstalling Windows and other software on my PCs whenever my computer gets infected. ;)

Anonymous said...

Hoo boy, I certainly didn't wish to spark a debate between mac and pc. That game got played out by '99 for me. there are benefits/detractions to both and people have their preferences. It's a zero sum result trying to convince people otherwise.

There aren't many exploits on OSX (And there are more then one) because of apples much lower market share and because cheap PC based hardware (Along with the OS) is easy to obtain by malignant virus-hobbyists. As apples market share grows you better believe that is going to change.

Anonymous said...

I've been hearing the "wait till Apple's market share gets bigger, then they'll get just as many viruses" thing for the last 6-8 years. Is there really not a single malignant hacker out there who can afford a Mac? I find that notion absurd.

Anonymous said...

It's not big enough... so while a virus writer may own a mac there still aren't enough targets for his wares.

Anonymous said...

I hear he did the robot for 6 minutes straight with no music...

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