Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Number One!

Per the Hollywood Reporter:

Universal's Despicable Me was the most-pirated film on torrent websites last week. ...

More great news, Shrek Forever After was #10 ... with a bullet.

21 comments:

Picky Pixie said...

I know there is a lot of mixed feelings about piracy, but in this case I see it as a good thing.

In most territories, Despicable Me has been out of theatres for months. Unless all of these downloads come from tertiary markets, which I doubt, that means interest is still high in the movie. High enough evidently that people are hunting it down to watch it again.

I'm in the boat of people who doesn't think piracy hurts home video sales. Box Office sales, potentially, but piracy between the theatrical run and the home distribution are different circumstances. I've downloaded movies when I didn't have a chance to see them in theatres, and if I've liked the movie I've pretty much eventually bought it every time. The piracy experience simply cannot compare to that of a Blu-Ray or even a DVD, and if people like the movie, they're going to jump on the retail just as quickly as they did the torrent.

So, in short, if people are liking the movie enough to watch it again on their 15" computer screens, I'm sure they'll like it enough to buy the DVD/Blu-Ray.

Anonymous said...

"I'm in the boat of people who doesn't think"

Yes.

The movie industry loses $9 Billion a year from video piracy. It is one of the key reasons DVD sales are down. Not the ONLY reason, but the biggest.

I think I'll stop by your house tonight and take your computer. I know you won't mind.

Anonymous said...

And I'll still their artwork, put my name on it, and sell it on Ebay. Boy I haven't had this much fun looting since the Rodney King verdict! Stealing worked for Bernie Madoff and Pat Robertson!

Anonymous said...

"I've downloaded movies when I didn't have a chance to see them in theatres, and if I've liked the movie I've pretty much eventually bought it every time."

Notice the "if" casually thrown in there.

But people who buy something on video that they already have on video are the exception.

Throughout history part of entertainment has been the small risk that you step out of your safety zone and pay to see something and it might not be fabulous.

No one would go to a play and insist that they will only pay for it if they liked it.

But now people want to pre-test everything.

Anonymous said...

Illegal downloading infuriates me

I know people will talk about this ad-nauseum and come with all kinds of complicated theories and give anecdotal evidence and every excuse, but the bottom line is, downloading movies and watching them is akin to stealing.

Get it via Netflix or iTunes or buy the Blu Ray or SOMETHING, but please dont steal or condone stealing. PLEASE

Anonymous said...

A pre-test is a trailer, and reviews. Pre-testing is NOT downloading he WHOLE movie.

That'd be like going to the car dealership and asking to drive the car for a year before deciding if you want to purchase it.

Anonymous said...

I meant "STEAL," not "still." Another cup of coffee on the way...

And if you're one of those people that have it in for "the man" for over bilking the audience/consumer for this sort of thing (and yes, they often do), I agree--RENT them. Studios make no money beyond selling rental dvd's to companies like NetFlix (albeit at a higher rate). But studios make NO money from rentals like this.

Just don't steal. Put yourself in the other person's shoes.

Floyd Norman said...

Confession time. Back in 1977 I bought a bootleg copy of "Star Wars." I just had to have that movie.

I feel I've paid for my sin many times over because I've been buying "Star Wars" ever since on various formats. George Lucas has made plenty off money off me.

Anonymous said...

Taking something without paying for it is STEALING. We all learned that in kindergarten for god's sake. Hey, that's a thought: you who approve of piracy - try explaining it to your kids. Try saying, "Yes, I'm taking something without paying for it, but it's NOT stealing in this case. Well, okay, it is, but I have good reasons for it." Then take a look at the kid's face. See if he doesn't look a little confused or betrayed. Maybe then you'll remember what having a conscience felt like.

Anonymous said...

"I think I'll stop by your house tonight and take your computer. I know you won't mind. "

Except in this case you'd be taking a copy of his computer, not the actual computer itself. is he harmed by you having a copy of his computer? no, perhaps the maker of the computer is harmed, but what if you never would have bought the computer in the first place or couldn't afford to? is the company still harmed?
This is where copying hits a grey area and a lot of it comes down to personal morality.
I know that I will buy most things I watched from a download but I know a lot of people won't.
I also know a lot of people could never afford to buy a lot of movies.
I also know that I've worked on a lot of movies that are downloaded and while there may be a little less income coming to the studios from those downloaded movies I will never see a dime either way.

Basically the studios have to change the way they do business. the damage is done. they have to adapt, either way its going to happen they are just making the transition take longer.

Anonymous said...

Guess what, schmuck, you are harmed by the illegal download because if the studio doesn't make the money they should due to this theft that you are so ambivalent about you won't be hired by the studio.
If someone could steal a copy of the computer it would be theft just the same as stealing it directly out of someone's house.
You can not give a shit all you want about how it only hurts big business, but eventually that hurts the little guy that works for big business. If you can't figure that out then there's no hope for you and your ilk.
The studios shouldn't have to change their 'ways' just because people are behaving more and more immorally. The laws have tio get tougher. Next time you decide you don't want to buy a legit copy of something you downloaded for free if you had to pay a big fine or go to jail you'd think twice about doing it next time, wouldn't you? Or your neighbor would or your kid that you're teaching bad behavior to might, eh...?

Anonymous said...

Thing is, with movies, you're not paying for any goods, just service (entertainment). So when you download that service without paying for it, it's theft.

It'd be as if you printed a fake movie ticket and went to the theater. Sure, all the tickets could still be sold, but the theater would be out one ticket sale because you wanted to see the movie and didnt pay for it.

It isnt a grey area, its theft. It's anonymous and almost impossible to police, which is why it's a grey area to you.

Anonymous said...

It's no use arguing with the download thieves. They've conjured up their excuses for their unethical behavior, and nothing you say to them is going to change them.

They're thieves. Why would an appeal to ethics make any difference to such a person?

Anonymous said...

If you can't afford it, then you can't afford it, doesn't mean you should start stealing. I don't understand how people don't get that? Would you walk into a store and steal a big flatscreen TV because you can't afford it?

"I feel I've paid for my sin many times over because I've been buying "Star Wars" ever since on various formats. George Lucas has made plenty off money off me."

But even that doesn't justify it. Lucas doesn't force you to buy a new version when it comes out.

Go rent a movie. It's really not that expensive, especially here in the US.

Anonymous said...

Am posting this animated video just to watch peoples heads explode regarding the piracy vs. copying argument...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeTybKL1pM4&feature=related

Anonymous said...

nonsense^

Anonymous said...

Guess what, schmuck,

hehehe "schmuck" Get off my lawn!

you are harmed by the illegal download because if the studio doesn't make the money they should due to this theft that you are so ambivalent about you won't be hired by the studio.

But I am hired all the time, that won't change anytime soon.

If someone could steal a copy of the computer it would be theft just the same as stealing it directly out of someone's house.

No, in actuality it wouldn't be the same, you are correct that its getting something for free.

You can not give a shit all you want about how it only hurts big business, but eventually that hurts the little guy that works for big business. If you can't figure that out then there's no hope for you and your ilk.

No I agree that it will hurt the industry in the long run, which is why the industry needs to change.

The studios shouldn't have to change their 'ways' just because people are behaving more and more immorally.

They should if they want to stay in business. Business has to adapt to customer needs or there is no need for that business.

The laws have tio get tougher.

Hows that working out for you so far?

heres some reading from a content creator (Father Ted, IT Crowd) that has some interesting views on this.

From:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/jun/21/graham-linehan-the-it-crowd

"With piracy, people think it's about getting stuff for free," he says. "It's not – it's about getting rid of the middleman that stands between you and your enjoyment of the film or music."

Linehan says he doesn't advocate piracy: "But that's the reason for it – companies have to meet people halfway. I get contacted daily by people in America saying is there any legal way to download The IT Crowd, but the whole mechanism is too rigid to allow for things like that."

A reluctance to really engage with the issue is not going to make it go away: "Consumers aren't going to put up with the old system, because it f*cks them over too much."

And more here in reference to a colleen doran article on piracy and comics:

http://www.twitlonger.com/show/71qfc7

"@andydiggle I understand where she's coming from, and I agree 100% with her closing words. People have got to see the human being behind the work. My problem is that the solutions most often provided in response to piracy (hobbling technology, not allowing people to actually own the things they buy, suing filesharers etc) are so aggressive and negative and backwards that they help turn the term 'pirate' into a badge of honour. I don't think there's anything particularly special or noble about being a pirate, but I do think there's something noble about the fight to create a fair deal for everyone--artist and audience-- given the sudden, irrevocable change in the landscape that technology has brought about.
The aggressive approach which has been the default one for the last few years among the major content providers has been an unmitigated disaster and it's making this transitional period last longer than it should"

And finally, a video..

http://whythatsdelightful.wordpress.com/2007/09/08/anyone-who-watches-this-owes-me-50p/

Ethan said...

I am not intending to stir the pot with this comment. The feelings on piracy have already been debated. But I want to call BS on: "The movie industry loses $9 Billion a year from video piracy." Sorry Anonymous, I'm not attacking you just the idea you posted.

I want to know where that number comes from. How do you quantify $9 Billion? I don't think that you can say that every download is a lost purchase. You also can not say that the industry has lost money in the last few years and that's becouse of piracy, it could easily be blamed on the recession, or lack of good variety.

This number is so important becouse it changes how you think about the issue. You are welcome to own opinion about piracy but not your own facts. The 9 Billion line is not true becouse you can not draw a strength line from piracy to sales.

But I do think that Steve Hulett's post is important. Tracking downloads tells us what people are interested in. Combined with boxoffice and DVD sales it will tell us what people are interested in.

The last thing I'm going to say is this debate is stupid. Piracy is not going away simply because we don't like it. Pastors are downloading movies and are sharing them with members of their congregation. Kids are surveyed and are asked if downloading movies is wrong they tend to say no, but if they are asked about compensation they agree the artists need to get payed. People don't see this as a conflict (I'm getting my facts from the book: Darknet by JD Lasica). So the battle over hearts and minds about piracy is lost and I don't think your going to get it back. (I'm not saying piracy is right or wrong, I'm talking about perception).

So ask yourself, why is Apple's iTunes is a growing company despite the fact that you can find everything in it's library for free on line? This is why I see the whole "9 Billion" as such a questionable statement. I don't think people are buying music and movies off of iTunes because "it's the right thing to do". People are doing it because easier then pirating it.

Case in point:
http://craphound.com/images/ifurapirate.jpeg

Anonymous said...

No one, to date, including these advocates of "the system has to change" have offered anything remotely like a solution. Just empty rhetoric about how piracy isn't all that bad and is part of evolution.

And by solution I mean a REAL solution not the usual "something like i-Tunes" tripe that isn't plausible (ask Apple).

And before you start throwing around the notion that the model needs to change consider the fact though piracy is hurting the industry the majority of people do behave ethically and do not resort to theft. Piracy is made up of a minority and of real criminal bootleggers - or are the bootleggers your solution to eliminating the 'middle man'.

Ethan said...

I never offered a solution, I don't think there is a solution. I do think we should continue to legally peruse the big offenders like napster and Pirate Bay. But not individuals who don't think they are doing anything wrong. You may have never downloaded a movie but are you going to tell me you've never made a mix tape? Recorded a TV show on a VCR? The industry has survived vhs tapes, recordable DVD players, it will survive the internet.

Anonymous said...

There's a HUGE difference between buying a CD or music some other way and copying it to other medium - that is considerd legal - and NOT buying it and copying it - that is not considered legal. Same for film.

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