Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The Art of Stop Motion

Via Deadline.



The Laika team describes the stress of creating a full-on, stop motion movie. ...

I've always enjoyed stop motion, from my elementary school days watching "Gumbi" on the TV, to sitting in my darkened bedroom with an 8mm projector running a print of the 1925 silent Lost World (from Blackhawk Films!) over and over.

I really loved them clay dinosaurs.

Today's stop motion is one hell of a lot slicker than the crudities of eighty or ninety years ago, but the reason our fine, entertainment conglomerates have no interest in the format is ... it makes minimal money.

As of now, Boxtrolls has collected $105,751,120 worldwide, so it's not close to making its $60,000,000 production cost back. And the stop motion feature Frankenweenie barely made twice its budget, bringing in a mere $81,491,068.

Contrast those performances with the failed CG feature Mr. Peabody and Sherman, which earned $272,912,430 at global turnstiles. No Laika film has come within a Brink's truck of that DreamWorks Animation write-off. If you want to know why none of the majors is seriously involved with stop-motion pictures, that's it.

Executive thighs only tingle for features that make $500 million (and up) at the world box office, and neither Laika films nor the most recent traditional Disney offerings make the cut.

2 comments:

F. Kousac said...

For all the work they put into their craft, you'd think they'd spend at least a little on story and characters. At least on ONE of their cartoons.

Celshader said...

For all the work they put into their craft, you'd think they'd spend at least a little on story and characters. At least on ONE of their cartoons.

I thought Laika's Coraline adapted Neil Gaiman's story well.

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